Dealing with stress

In one of my bad moods, I feel pressure building up in my mind like a boiler on it’s last legs. I normally roll a cigarette, thinking I can move the weight off my head, assuming that the main reason I feel the way I do is because of my acute addiction to nicotine.

It then struck me that even just the act of rolling, getting up and doing something instantly, however small, alleviates at least one blocked ‘valve’ in my thought process. It enables you to let go of the encroaching prospect of action that, paradoxically spurs you to inaction, through my the ancient human condition of laziness.

With thoughts on my mind focused on things like moving house, fixing bikes, cars and general guild-ridden money spending, I have a lot of tasks to do that seem disproportionately bigger than they actually are, much like the thought of rolling a cigarette; the prospect of action peers down at me, intimidating. Dealing with these tasks head-on (or, ‘off’ ;)), immediately, is a surefire way of ‘shrinking’ the issue, chipping away at the ‘blockage’.

Although, in hindsight, it is beneficial to carefully think out the important things in your life, I have come to believe that instinct accounts for the majority of a decision, even if it happens subliminally. Relying on instinct thereby, will help get rid of those pesky thoughts that seem to collide and cause a tangle in you head, allowing you to focus on getting the task at hand completed.

In my opinion, this is why having something like a job that challenges you, forcing you to make important decisions quickly is extremely important to the welfare of people’s mental health and their ability to tackle the natural build up of stress that seems to press on all of us.

Following this, once a task is completed, it is like finishing a chapter in a book, allowing you the opportunity to look back, see your strengths and weaknesses and perhaps even bang your head on the table for thinking it was daunting in the first place.

Nevertheless, eventually you must face another task, and another, and another. A good boiler never stops; one that doesn’t work and builds up pressure, must eventually burst.

Nobody likes a broken boiler.

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